Christ the King

I am doing some sermon prep for this Sunday (Christ the King Sunday).  My question for you is this:

How do we speak to people about Jesus being “King” and “Lord” in a world where those two words/titles mean very little?

Our culture and context is radically different from that of Jesus’ day.  “King” and “Lord” meant something to people then.  Those titles conjured up images and definitions for them.  They understood their roles and meaning for their lives.  So how should we understand these today?

I am curious on your thoughts about this.

-edh-

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6 responses to “Christ the King

  1. First, we must teach people what a Sovereign King is. This is difficult in a democracy where we have eliminated Kings and Lords. However, the same problem occurs when we as pastors and teachers must educate our people on grace. If they do not have an adequate concept of sin and its consequences, how can we move them into grace and its benefits?

    You are right in saying our culture is different than the culture of Jesus, where people understood the concept of Kings. Still, there are many cultures today that do understand that concept. However, I would encourage you to never assume what your flock may or may not know. Not many are called to be teachers. Not many of us really enjoy digging deep into the Word and feeding ourselves. Many Christians get their diet of the Word once a week when they are spoon-fed by their pastors. I’m doing all I can to help my people learn to feed themselves, but I must never assume they are further along than they are. I may get discouraged by where they are (Heb. 5:11-14), but I’m always trying to move them to the next level (Heb. 6:1-3).

    Blessings,

    Jim

  2. heartofapastor

    Thank you, Jim for your thoughts.

    I agree…people first need to understand they are sinners; that we need help. Once we get to that point, Jesus as our Sovereign King is a comforting thing…especially when we understand Jesus in terms of grace.

    I try not to make assumptions about what people know or don’t know, but sometimes that is hard. Moving people to the next level…that too is hard, but I keep trying.

  3. Jim’s idea of teaching about Jesus’ Kingship by connecting with the vestiges that we know of royal authority makes sense.
    I wonder if it’s also key to teach about a proper fear for the Lord as we teach about Jesus’ ultimate sovereignty. It seems that the fear of the Lord ought to help us understand that God is ultimately other than us.
    We don’t know the fear the very real fear that people did in facing kings that was known 2000 years ago. Somehow we’ve become very cozy with a self conceived god who always accepts us; not with a God who would take issue with what we do and have the authority to correct us for our actions.

    Thanks for the thoughts
    pax,
    unlikely

  4. John’s statement that “we’ve become very cozy with a self-conceived god who always accepts us” reminds me of a quote by Ann Lamott. “You can safely assume that you’ve created God in your own image, when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do.”

    That quote is funny and tragically true at the same time.

    Blessings,

    Jim

  5. Hi Eric, while this is not related to this post, I wanted to let you know that I have begun a new blog. Not much there yet, but it is a fresh start. Hope you had a great Thanksgiving!

    David